Musings of an Ist

meelo:

Most canon A:TLA pairings: Zuko/Awkwardness

tigersmilk:

thismighthurt:

Intimacy: The Whys, Hows, How-Nots, and So-Nots

A great Scarleteen article on intimacy by Heather Corinna with a few cute example illustrations! More illustrations in the article :)

nofreedomlove:

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"Image Credit: Carol Rossetti

When Brazilian graphic designer Carol Rossetti began posting colorful illustrations of women and their stories to Facebook, she had no idea how popular they would become. 

Thousands of shares throughout the world later, the appeal of Rosetti’s work is clear. Much like the street art phenomenon Stop Telling Women To Smile, Rossetti’s empowering images are the kind you want to post on every street corner, as both a reminder and affirmation of women’s bodily autonomy. 

"It has always bothered me, the world’s attempts to control women’s bodies, behavior and identities," Rossetti told Mic via email. "It’s a kind of oppression so deeply entangled in our culture that most people don’t even see it’s there, and how cruel it can be."

Rossetti’s illustrations touch upon an impressive range of intersectional topics, including LGBTQ identity, body image, ageism, racism, sexism and ableism. Some characters are based on the experiences of friends or her own life, while others draw inspiration from the stories many women have shared across the Internet. 

"I see those situations I portray every day," she wrote. "I lived some of them myself."

Despite quickly garnering thousands of enthusiastic comments and shares on Facebook, the project started as something personal — so personal, in fact, that Rossetti is still figuring out what to call it. For now, the images reside in albums simply titled “WOMEN in english!" or "Mujeres en español!" which is fitting: Rossetti’s illustrations encompass a vast set of experiences that together create a powerful picture of both women’s identity and oppression.

One of the most interesting aspects of the project is the way it has struck such a global chord. Rossetti originally wrote the text of the illustrations in Portuguese, and then worked with an Australian woman to translate them to English. A group of Israeli feminists also took it upon themselves to create versions of the illustrations in Hebrew. Now, more people have reached out to Rossetti through Facebook and offered to translate her work into even more languages. Next on the docket? Spanish, Russian, German and Lithuanian.

It’s an inspiring show of global solidarity, but the message of Rossetti’s art is clear in any language. Above all, her images celebrate being true to oneself, respecting others and questioning what society tells us is acceptable or beautiful.

"I can’t change the world by myself," Rossetti said. "But I’d love to know that my work made people review their privileges and be more open to understanding and respecting one another."

From the site: All images courtesy Carol Rossetti and used with permission. You can find more illustrations, as well as more languages, on her Facebook page.

princess-slay-ya:

My most popular post has received a lot of arguments lately, so I figured I’d respond to the most common points people bring up.

Sources:

Carrie Fisher on her costumes 

what supermodels wear in hell

 on Padme’s wardrobe 

to get a general gist of Queen Jamillia’s and Oola’s screen time, here are the scripts for Attack of the Clones (Jamillia is in 359 word scene) and Return of the Jedi (Oola is in scenes that add up to 275 words)

Star Wars Bechedel Test results  here

The most common concern was my health. Presumably I, as a fat woman, would not know how to properly operate the complicated piece of equipment known as a bikini. What if I strangled in all the straps and ties? What if I became distracted by the complexity of spandex, a substance heretofore unknown to me, and wandered blindly into traffic? What if I ate it? I’m not sure what all these well-meaning people thought was going to happen to me. Blood pressure, heart problems, joint problems and cholesterol were all brought up, but I didn’t see any kind of warning label anywhere on the suit that suggested the Surgeon General had investigated these claims. I remain skeptical as to the health problems bikinis cause.

The secondary concern seemed to be that I would be “glorifying obesity.” I was going to look so good in my bikini, I would make others question their perceptions of beauty and body size? It seems like that’s more of an inducement to wear the bikini than not to wear it. And it’s a lovely compliment; I never knew I was so gorgeous as to make people rethink their lifestyles. Move over, Helen of Troy; Jenny Trout is going to wage a war on good health and fit bodies!

A third type of person only worried about my comfort: “Wouldn’t you be more comfortable in a one piece?” Or perhaps I would be more comfortable if I didn’t go to the beach at all. If I venture into the water in a bikini, the sight of my melanin-deficient Michigan belly might attract beluga whales. Sure, I could secretly live among them and learn their ancient ways, but I couldn’t keep that kind of ruse up forever. One day, they would learn of my betrayal, sparking tense conflict between humans and those gentle giants of the sea.

Nothing could possibly go wrong with this plan.

This was a cool interview and I enjoyed reading it.

Things To Remember

wittyandcharming:

  • Don’t be angry at yourself when anxiety/depression flares up. It isn’t your fault and no one blames you and if they do they’re pieces of shit.
  • Don’t orbit around your perceived value so much. You’re not the sum total of what you produce.
  • Don’t let yourself wonder why people love you. That’s not how it works. There are not stark, individual reasons that a person can enumerate about why they love you. It’s the entire, unique combination of what and who you are.
Most women in the modern Western world have no space of our own in the home—no den, basement workshop, garage, outside domain, or special chair in the living room. Though the kitchen and bedroom often are thought of as “her” rooms, they are hers only as spaces in which she is expected to provide services to and for her man. Private space—space in which she can just be, space where she does not have to justify her presence by being engaged in work—is nonexistent unless she actively creates and maintains it.

"Loving to Survive" Graham (via kingcobracommander)

and its interesting that when watching tv or reading things the “man cave” always gets brought up as a half joke but really more serious thing that every man “needs” but then when women have craft rooms or other similar things related to their own interest it is always the butt of a joke (haha silly wimminz wanting space of their own)

(acciomjollinir)

We’re looking for our next house right now and we are looking for one with enough space that I can have a craft room. That’s non negotiable, I craft a lot and it’s good for my mental health but mostly it’s important to me and therefore it’s important to my boyfriend too.

When I tell people that there is a LOT of pushback. They act like we are being extravagant (I’m aware we are very privileged to be able to afford this but this is fro. People with three cars and five tvs) or say thing like ‘where will [boyfriend] go?!’

Oh I dunno, LITERALLY ANYWHERE ELSE IN THE WHOLE HOUSE, which is also his? Where will he watch tv? Probably the lounge room. You know. Where the tv is.

Or they say ‘will he at least get a shed??’ No, since he hates gardening. Probably I will get a shed.

It makes me so mad, but I hadn’t really articulated why until this post.

(via vaspider)

dumb-science-jokes:

Don’t hate on Ligase, guys. He’s just trying to make ends meet.